Men’s underwear.

Andy wrote…

I bought men’s underwear for the first time today. I even stood there and made myself browse through my options. I kept thinking, “Someone’s going to say something.” But you know what? No one did, not even the cashier.

When have you expected resistance for your gender anarchy/presentation and received none?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on February 21st, 2009 at 08:00 am

Category: your voice 8 comments »

8 Responses to “Men’s underwear.”

  1. Anonymous

    People working in retail never care are much about what people are buying as we worry they will. Everything is a blur to them as long as you’re not an ass. :)

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  2. noah

    congrats. i hope there’s more to come!

    [Reply]

  3. noah

    i think i read it in wrong way. sorry, ignore the comment above.

    [Reply]

  4. Anja Flower

    You know what I love? I have to talk with someone on one of those official phone lines for the hospital or the bank, to set an appointment or something, and they address me by my male name because it’s still my legal name. I tell them I’m transgender, please call me Anja… and they don’t blink! Or if they do, they sure don’t sound like it. These systems are learning that transpeople are just part of the mileu, no different than anybody else.

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  5. diss

    i expected border control and airport security to be a bit of an issue, but never encountered any problems.

    the “worst” was shortly after going fulltime, when i set of the metal detector. an officer asked if i was a man or a woman, because they couldn’t tell. i told them i was a bit of both, as i was in transition. so they let me choose if i wanted to be patted down by a male or female officer.

    i got the impression that the most troubled person in the interaction was the officer who’d had to question my gender.

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  6. Benjamin Dionysus

    I’m cisgendered male (broadly speaking), but have been wearing a skirt for the past four years. It’s a kilt (the manliest skirt possible!) but even still I’m surprised–I can count the time I’ve gotten flack for it on one hand.

    This holds true even if I branch out–I’ve a rather small white skirt that I usually wear to croquet that has never gotten me any grief, either.

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  7. jean

    I’m very gender-neutral-appearing, and I’ve found that people are a lot more confused when they have to answer my questions in the hardware store, than when I’m buying men’s underwear or other male accoutrements (I’m beardless & have wide hips). In the hardware store, the way the clerks respond to you is very gendered, they assume different levels of expertise by gender, talk in a different tone of voice, etc. When they don’t get those instant cues, it seems to throw them for a serious loop…

    I wonder if the same thing would apply in a store where females are expected to have more expertise, like a fabric or sewing machine shop (as off-the-cuff examples)?

    …and yeah, it seems to bother other people much more than it bothers me, when they can’t figure out immediately what gender I am…

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  8. Anonymous

    Retailers care a lot less than we think. I used to be embarrassed buying makeup until I realised they probably thought I was buying it for a girlfriend. Nowadays I don’t really care what people think I’m buying the stuff for and I only get funny looks when I’m digging to the bottom of the bargain bin.

    [Reply]


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