Profile: Jordan

You can call me… Jordan. Or Aristotle or Logan or Duck Foot. Names aren’t that important, but I would rather it not be something like Isabella.

I identify as… An androgynous man, a bit genderfluid, an intellectual human being who just happens to look like a girl to the rest of the world and likes doing the gender-warp.

As far as third-person pronouns go, … I’m getting to the point where female ones, which I always get, make me temporarily a psychopath. So it’s best to avoid those.

I’m attracted to… Uniqueness, humour, creativity, intelligence, liberal values, and fellow queers. Usually, people more feminine than me. And of course, the very special person I’m with.

When people talk about me, I want them to… Respect me. What else can I ask for?

I want people to understand… That appearance has nothing to do with gender. You can have long hair and wear jewellery and still be a man. It’s ridiculous that in a world where masculine women are widespread, feminine men are still considered strange.

About Jordan
In my mid teen years, on the brink of coming out for the second time. It would help if the prospect of everything changing didn’t scare the living daylights out of me, even with a positive change.

» Define yourself. «


Posted by on January 29th, 2011 at 08:00 am

Category: profiles 4 comments »

4 Responses to “Profile: Jordan”

  1. radical/rebel

    “It would help if the prospect of everything changing didn’t scare the living daylights out of me, even with a positive change.”

    I haven’t found anything more freeing or exhilarating than having everything change, especially when the changes felt like things that I never saw coming. good luck, keep yr chin up. we are building a new world, genderqueer/fluid/less person by person.

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  2. Nikolai

    Wow…. this brings back memories. Submitted this a year ago and forgot about it. I guess I should update and say I’m out, over a month on testosterone, and about to change my name to one I wasn’t even considering back then.

    Thanks, radical. I’m notorious for freaking out about any changes around me. Took me long enough to get over it, but I’m so glad I did.

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  3. Nazza

    Not freaking out for me is a slow process. I’m still dealing with guilt and shame, but I can also look and see the progress I have made. That is worth celebrating, for sure.

    Part of it is that I really want my outward appearance to conform to the way I believe I need to look. It never will, but I’ve also sought to love the whole of myself as I am.

    I think another large part of the issue with me is that gender is so complicated. There are so many parts of me that are allied with “male” or “female” and in so many different combinations. Sometimes I think it would be so much easier if gender wasn’t so complex. And if it were just me in the world, or if I lived only with other people who were genderqueer or somewhere under the trans umbrella, it would be one thing. But I’m really hypersensitive to gender policing, which is what keeps me fearful.

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  4. Jessica

    “It’s ridiculous that in a world where masculine women are widespread, feminine men are still considered strange.” So true!

    [Reply]


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