Archive for 2013


The Eyes of a Friend


Submitted by Sarah Helene. Photography by Eva G. Gala.

“This is one of our best friends who, at first, did not believe that she’d be a good model. I believe this photo proves her more than wrong. She is as beautiful inside as she is outside and we love her very much.”

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Additional note: “We took this photo for our company Kookie of London. Kookie is owned by Luke (a transman) and myself Sarah and we offer classic, affordable secondhand clothing and homewares. By including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and genderqueer models, as well as those who are heteronormative and cisgender, we strive to make everybody feel welcome!”


Posted by on December 30th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 5 comments »

No Gender


Someone wrote…

I just wish we lived in a world where it was okay to have no gender, without worrying about being ostracized, or being told that I must have a gender in order to live in this world.

What’s your experience?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on December 30th, 2013 at 08:00 am

your voice | 13 comments »

Autumn


Reposted from marquimode (via Queering Style).

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Posted by on December 29th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | Comment »

Recommendation: Eon


Someone recommends…

EonCover

Eon
A book by Alison Goodman

Though primarily a fantasy story based in ancient China, the main character is a boy called Eon — who is actually a biological female. While at first sie is “pretending” so that sie can train with the other boys, the book has some very thoughtful moments where Eon starts to wonder whether it really is acting, or whether sie actually feels male at heart. Even the synopsis of the book online calls hir “he”, even though it is never actually clarified in the first book whether sie feels male or female or other.

There are other characters that tackle gender issues such a trans woman, who is treated respectfully as truly female. The book, overall, handles gender issues very well even though they aren’t the focal point of the novel and I’d really recommend reading it for any genderqueer lover of fantasy novels.

» Recommend something. «


Posted by on December 29th, 2013 at 08:00 am

books, recommendations | Comment »

A tutu to my tux!


Submitted by the proud parents.

“14 weeks old :)”

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Posted by on December 28th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

Nibling


Someone wrote…

My brother’s wife is having a child this spring. The doctors have told us it will be male. I’ve been calling him my nephew but of course we won’t know gender until much later. So then I found this word:

Noun
nibling (plural niblings)
A nephew or niece, especially in the plural or as a gender-neutral term.

According to Wiktionary. I think this is the greatest name for nieces and nephews!

What’s your experience?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on December 28th, 2013 at 08:00 am

your voice | 4 comments »

John Laughlin


Reposted from John Laughlin (via nice skirt, bro).

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Posted by on December 27th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | Comment »

Profile: Sam


Sam

You can call me… Sam, Sammy, Sam-o, Birdie, Owl.

I identify as… feminine feeling, masculine dressing boy. There’s a girl in there too who sometimes makes an appearance. A boy in a (fe)male body. Because it’s me that makes it male.

As far as third-person pronouns go, … I’ll answer to “she” by reflex, but “he” always makes me smile.

I’m attracted to… feminine boys. Masculine boys. Genderfluid boys I can mix and match the gender roles with. Bravery and ethics. Eyes that steal my attention. And a good, caring heart.

When people talk about me, I want them to… think I’m a nice person. Laugh about me in a good humored way where I could laugh with them. All while using the correct pronouns.

I want people to understand… I’ve only changed for the better since coming out. My self-esteem and self-worth has never been so priceless. But it’s still hard for me. Getting misgendered is difficult to swallow and smile through. But I also understand it’s difficult for others watching me go through this. For me, gender is a constant changing thing. I’m never one thing all the time. And just because I’m Sam now on the outside, doesn’t mean I stopped being Stephanie on the inside.

About Sam, Sammy, Sam-o, Birdie, Owl.
I’m a 23 year old author of my first LGBTQ book Parker. One of many in a series of sorts. I’m going to film school next year to write movies for the future. I’m bringing our stories and lives to written word and screen. I’m passionate about writing LGBTQ stories because it’s too important not to share. My hero and inspiration is Dustin Lance Black. I found love in a human when I thought I was unlovable. I’m a vegetarian and believe in God. I’m a whole mess of things I’m learning to love about myself.

» Define yourself. «


Posted by on December 27th, 2013 at 08:00 am

profiles | 2 comments »

First time wearing a binder


Submitted by Jackie, the model and photographer.

“I consider myself genderfluid, and this was my first step to feeling comfortable during my more male days.”

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Posted by on December 26th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

First Time


Someone wrote…

Oh man oh man oh man.

As a genderqueer, this is definitely a major highlight of my life: the first time I’ve ever worn a binder. Got it in the mail yesterday (and boy, was it a struggle to put on but hey, so were the one-pieces I worked with back in high school on the swim team until I got used to them). Got it on though, and tried a few button-up shirts I used to wear that have fit me *perfectly* in the past except for my DD chest blocking it: fit like a glove.

Now I don’t have to drown in my clothing anymore, and I don’t have to look at these cartoonishly large mounds that have made me feel awkward in my own skin. This will be a much-needed step forward.

What’s your experience?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on December 26th, 2013 at 08:00 am

your voice | 1 comment »

The Color of Our Feathers


Reposted from thegreenflamingodesigns (via I Like Bois).

“On the other hand, there are the younger kids at Vanessa’s school who look to her and see possibility. Wow, I can look like that too! Which is Vanessa’s view on androgynous culture in general. ‘It could be bigger,’ she says. ‘The more people dress the way they want and express themselves… the more people will be happy in general.'”

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Posted by on December 25th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

Santa Klaus


The legendary countertenor, Klaus Nomi, brings some Yületide cheer.


Posted by on December 25th, 2013 at 08:00 am

video | Comment »

Dwyck


Reposted from hikristofferson (via I Like Bois).

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Posted by on December 24th, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

Societal Expectations


Someone wrote…

I am tired of labels. This desire to “simplify” things by putting people in specific categories just over complicates things instead.

I like wearing masculine clothes and having short hair. Once in a while I like wearing make-up and more feminine shirts. I am attracted to personality; it will always be the deciding factor.

It doesn’t confuse me, societal expectations confuse me. This need to be defined shouldn’t be necessary in order to feel community.

What’s your experience?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on December 24th, 2013 at 08:00 am

your voice | 1 comment »

Nice little stroll


Reposted via Queering Style.

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Posted by on December 23rd, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

Recommendation: Gender Bill of Rights


Cuna recommends…

Tr?n?rchism

I dream of a world where every single one of these listed items is respected.

Some of my favourites are:

“6. No one’s gender should ever be assumed. No one should ever be assumed to have a gender.
7. You have a right to full control over your gender beginning at birth. No surgical alterations should be made on unconsenting infants in order to fit them into a certain paradigm of gender. Gendered names, pronouns, and descriptors should never be used until children can decide for themselves how they wish to be known to the world.
[…]
16. You have a right to total control over your own body and sole authority in making decisions about it.”

Imagine that. Which one(s) are your favourites? What would you add?

» Recommend something. «


Posted by on December 23rd, 2013 at 08:00 am

articles, blogs, recommendations | 3 comments »

infiniteextreme


Reposted from infiniteextreme (via I Like Bois).

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Posted by on December 22nd, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 1 comment »

Positivity


Someone wrote…

I love your positive attitude – especially towards all those “in betweens” like I am. I’m a girlfag. I know many people don’t like the term as it is. I’m not that happy with it myself… but it was coined in the 1980s – and well, at least it gave me a term to describe myself.

When I came out as a girlfag I realized just how much hate there was because I was “too queer” or “not queer enough”. People said “I must call myself transsexual” or I’m just a “heterosexual pervert” and so on and so on. It pulled me down a lot that people could hate so much on someone who was just so happy to have finally found out what was going on with him_her.

So I’m happy to see a positive haven on here :) Stay open and great. :)

What’s your experience?

And what are you thinking about gender right now?


Posted by on December 22nd, 2013 at 08:00 am

your voice | 8 comments »

skirtmanly


Reposted from skirtmanlyasfuck (via nice skirt, bro).

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Posted by on December 21st, 2013 at 10:00 am

faces | 2 comments »

Question: Genderfluid help


asks…

So like, I’m a 13 year old genderfluid person, and I’ve recently come out to my parents, but I feel like they aren’t really helping me adapt, and are more or less just waiting for this to pass.
It’s really hurtful, and when I asked to get a binder, I was rejected, which especially hurt me. I live in a small town, so there isn’t any kind of help group around here that I can talk to, meaning the only place I can turn to is online.
Is there anything I can do to
1) help my parents understand, and
2) help myself adapt to this new lifestyle?

Please post your response in the comments below.

» Ask Genderfork «


Posted by on December 21st, 2013 at 08:00 am

questions | 5 comments »

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