Question: Binding as a Genderqueer person

CJ asks…

What is a good way to start experimenting with chest binding? I’m genderqueer and the only change I’d like to make to my gender expression is to bind my chest.

I was wondering where a good place to start would be?

Please post your response in the comments below.

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Posted by on January 30th, 2015 at 10:00 am

Category: questions 7 comments »

7 Responses to “Question: Binding as a Genderqueer person”

  1. Anonymous

    I suggest either getting a binder or making one, just DO NOT USE ANYTHING THAT WILL NOT STRETCH WHEN YOU BREATH. I made my binder out of a pair of old PE shorts and some elastic. All I did was cut off the legs, attach some elastic, and then sew it all together to the right size. Both materials were stretchy, which is important.
    Good luck :)

    P.S- Sorry if this wasn’t the answer you were looking for, I just hoped it might help.

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  2. V

    Hi, I am similar in the way that the only part of my body I feel comfortable with is my boobs. I usually wear soft tight sports bras, the kind without any wires or push-ups, as I feel like they flatten my chest a bit and are also really comfortable. I also have a binder that I bought from http://danae.info/ for days when I really don’t feel comfortable with my chest. At first I used to bandage my chest but I really advice against it as it gave me back pain and was really uncomfortable and cumbersome.

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    anta replied:

    Wow, thanks, I’d never heard of Danae before.

    It’d be great to buy binders of European origin (I ive in Finland), but it doesn’t seem like they’ve got the kind of velcro binders I like.

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  3. white lines

    I bought my binder from Underworks
    http://www.f2mbinders.com

    They have options for larger or smaller chest sizes, depending on whether you need more compression or less.

    Many of the home-made binders only work for people with small chests, but since Underworks binders (and other commercially made binders) are specifically made to bind chests, they fit all sorts of sizes and are made specifically for comfort and reliability.

    Never ever bind with a bandage or anything that constricts your breathing or compromises your bone/muscle structure or breast tissue. It’s not only really really uncomfortable, but can cause serious long-term damage.

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  4. nola

    Safety is paramount- we’re talking about restricting your ribcage here. Don’t even think about using ACE bandage or duct tape to bind; they’re dangerous, buy a real binder. Save your coin, save your ribs. I got mine from underworks and it works well.
    When you have your binder on: if you have difficulty breathing [i.e. might faint, struggling], take the binder off as soon as possible. If your ribs ache, take the binder off. Do not bind during any vigourous exercise. Anytime you need all the air you can get or your breathing is likely to be restricted by anything other than your binder, don’t bind. Don’t wear the binder for more than maybe 8 hours, less while you’re still getting used to it. If you decide you like binding enough to do it every day, take at least one day off a week to give your body a rest. I like to carry a bra around with me in case I need to un-bind.

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  5. Anonymous

    Be aware of safety issues. No more than 8 hours and stop when you are having trouble.

    If you actually search “chest binder” on Amazon, there is a large selection that is suprisingly affordable and most have free shipping. The sizes are weird, always check the comments because there will usually be at least some people who have experimented enough to have a more applicable sizing chart than the one given.

    [Reply]

  6. D.F. Lykaios

    Hey Cj!
    Great question… so in my experience with chest binding the cheapest, safest, easiest, and least noticible thing to do is to use a quad. So what this is is a combination of two sports bras, and two tight fitting tank tops. You start by putting on a sports bra, and then put the second one on backwards. You then put on a forwards tank top (small sizes for best results) and then put another on backwards. Then, if you want to, it’s not nesscesary but I do it, you can put on another forward facing sports bra on over the tank tops just to hold everything together. Make sure not to wear it for too long, and be sure that the material is flexible so you can breathe. Best wishes! D.F. Lykaios

    [Reply]


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