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Oh my gosh, Al, you are so awesome. <3 I love to see other nonbinary Christian folks. Let's be bff's! My instagram is @a.j.is.my.name. I am a transmasc nonbinary dude, who is also morally conservative and Christian. x3 I didn't see an Insta for you, but if you poke me, I'll gladly follow you!
- AJ on Profile: Al or Alison
you are so right, the neglect is what hurts the most
- adam on Profile: Mish
Quality posts is the secret to attract the viewers to go to see the website, that's what this website is providing.
- industrial chemical suppliers on Question: Patchy Leg Hair
Aww... Guys!! I am so glad that I found a website where I can truly be who I am. I can definitely wait. Ari, never feel like you are not good enough. I am only 13 but have already gone down that road- it basically it a highway to depression. Hugs EVERYONE!! thx for this amazing site.
- Alix/Anna on Why You (Maybe) Haven't Seen Your Profile...
HI Gabriel. I am Alix/ Anna. I am pretty alone right now. I am out to 1 person: my ftm trans-friend. I love Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, Divergent, Hunger Games and basically just books. I am on my middle school cross-country and soccer teams. I will be friends with anyone if they are willing to accept my weirdness, sarcasm and endless book references. Hope we can be friends, Alix/Anna.
- Alix/Anna on Profile: Gabriel
really?? google can screw w/ this site to make it appear further in. and this is about being helpful, screw "original". if something works for someone else or they have experience with it then how about we just try listening to each other and taking chill pills. And, ShellyChief, have you ever heard of run-on sentences, periods or conjunctions? And btw, we really don't care- as long as it works.
- Alix/Anna on Question: Gender-neutral family names
I have checked your site and i've found some duplicate content, that's why you don't rank high in google's search results, but there is a tool that can help you to create 100% unique articles, search for; boorfe's tips unlimited content
- ShellyChief on Question: Gender-neutral family names
I hear you, dude. Being born a girl and then identifying as a genderfluid pansexual human being is difficult for families to understand. My whole family is transphobic and fluidphobic to an extreme. I've been emotionally abused, driven out of town and left on the side of the road until I "was a girl again" (I lied to get myself out of that situation) and now I'm scared to bring up the topic. My parents think I'm a straight girl, but recent events have left me knowing that I'm pansexual. I've been, very sadly, just friends with this one boy for a while and now I'm also crushing on my best friend, who's a girl. While my situation is different than yours, just remember that you are perfect. Also remember to surround yourself with friends who actually understand you. My friends call me by my respective pronouns (Ge, Gim, Gier ((Ge-ar)), They, Them, Their) and they respect that even though I'm in Girl Classes at school, I'm not a girl. My only problem is my biological family. I came out as pansexual today to my twin sister and she didn't know what it meant. I didn't bother explaining as she was the one who slapped me in the face when I first came out as genderfluid. And because me parents are very religious and thinking that you HAVE to date the opposite gender, I can't tell them yet. While I'm not giving direct advice, hopefully my story gives you some ideas on how to come out better. I'm also open for advice if you guys have any!
- Agender_Kiddo on Coming Out
Oof, this is a tough situation. My parents, when I came out to them, began asking tough questions that I didn't have the answers to, but they do love you. If your parents are forcing you to be feminine, then try to pack masculine clothing in a bag and change out of feminine clothing. Why this may not be a solution to your problem, it will ease the pain. Try to gather as much information as possible and then have a heart to heart (to heart?) conversation with them. If that doesn't and/or the situation gets worse, try to contact a friend and stay at their house. If you don't have anywhere to go, just try to persevere and remember, Galatians 3:28 – “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
As a minor, I'm not sure how to deal with spouses, but try to ask her this, "If you had a close friend that was Genderfluid, what would you do?" The question can tell you if it's ok to open up to her and if your relationship will remain intact. Again, this is just a recommendation and remember, Galatians 3:28 – “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
My parents hated it when I got a pixie cut, it took my MONTHS to get them to cut it, but they called me a selfish little GIRL when I said that I wanted to wear a tuxedo to my friend's grandpa's funeral and in the end, I had to wear a stupid dress. Parents, especialy fluiphobic and transphobic parents, will be stubborn and won't understand, so just wait it out and remember, Galatians 3:28 – “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Wow, that's tough. I recommend telling your Dad. If he's trying to get gender-neutral bathrooms, then he may be more understanding. My parents used to think that I was a lesbian because I cut my hair short and that I kept inviting my friends that were girls over to our house, but I honestly was straight. I'm not straight anymore, I'm pansexual, but that's besides the point. If your parents are confused, try to find a youtube video that explains genderfluid people and fingers crossed that they understand! I hope this helped in someway!
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I may not have the most sage advice for you C, but in my situation, I told my LGBTQA+ friends and they seemed to understand, but my parents actually drove me out of town and left me for the night, saying that if they came back, I had to be a girl. That has nothing to do with your situation, but if your father says that he hates Genderfluid people, then wait to tell him. If you're 14, try waiting unill you're in High School, you know 16, 17, 18 years old. It's a long wait, but trust me, my friend, the wait is worth it.
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
LOVE IT!! And i like your idea of getting rid of gender rules and words altogether.
- Alix on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
Look, for me, i chose to "call" myself genderqueer b/c it can mean what i need it to. Fluid, agender, nonbinary,ect.
- Alix on Question: Female Genderqueer
Agender kiddo- If your parents give you BS about God only making two genders then tell them that God doesn't make mistakes so you are perfectly fine.
- Alix on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hey Jaden. I am gender queer and I get a lot of questions and crap like that at school if I dress masc. as well. if someone says "that is a guys top" or whatever just say " I wasn't aware my clothing had a gender." just be confident, sassy, or whatever works for you. people in general just need to let go of their stereotypes of gender. and btw those stereotypes are what makes people judge us on a daily basis. GOOD LUCK and I hope this helps
- Alix on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
That describes me as well. I'm not sure about the OP, but I am AMAB. AAA.
- Amerigo on Aromantic Asexual Agender
Don't be afraid of what others think! If your friends judge you for this decision, get new friends. Being gender fluid is YOUR decision and YOUR decision alone! So, go out and be yourself!
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
As a person who used to fear judgement, all I can say for you, my friend, is be yourself. If you want to paint your nails, do it. If you want to play football, do it. Even if people look at you funny, just remember that you are an amazing and unique human being. Your true friends won't judge you for it and those are the people you'll want to be around. Hope this helped!
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hey everyone! I'm genderfluid, or at least I'm pretty sure. The past month or so, I really wanted to paint my nails, I always stop myself. I think the thing that stops me is that I'm scared of being judged for it at school and in my family. I don't think others will take my identity seriously if I paint my nails.I know that it's something small and probably silly, but for the first time in a few years I really care about what other people think. It's the weekend, and I will be spending time around really supportive people, so I've decided to paint them. I don't think I'll have nail polish on near my mom or at school yet, not until i stop worrying. Can anybody help me get over being afraid of judgement? Thanks.
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
hey! I couldn't ummm figure out how to ska question so im doing I in the comments if you have any opinion can you please say so....I'm FtM but am still "female" as such but was wondering about binding i'm 11. and my mum believes its this whole massive step... for her. when in fact I get that its quite big for her to be told her daughter is a boy! but I think she could get me a binder I've promised for the first few months I will wear it twice or 3 times a week max then slowly go to max 5/6 days a week anyway what are your thoughts on 11 year olds binding or is it too young to know your gender/sex,i don't think it is and if ur trans (,non-binary,a-gender,gender-fluid,bi-gender etc) then you know what I mean when I say "you know you are not in the correct body". Thanks! ? edit: my sister wrote this (and I gave her permission) but I'm 15 and would like to see the answers so I can find out and help her with ?his? transition!
- ash on Question: Binder for 13 year old
I hate ma'am and am looking for alternatives. It is so gender, age based and Britain-derived. It's got to go! How about "Leaf" or what they use in Norway, "friend"?
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
I want to come out to my friends but I already told them im Gay. But now I realize its much more than that. One day I relized I want to be a girl, then another day it changed. I slowly realized i was gender fluid. How do I explain this to them by not making them think this is all a phase. And thankyou for all you all have dont to help me find my identity.
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I find "associate" can work in many of these situations.
- tempfile on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
Wow I feel this so deeply
- Anonymous on Question: Female Genderqueer
Thank you very much for reading, and taking the time to answer. It's important to me. It's good to know going to live by myself might help. Thank you, again. Good luck to you, and please take care. Thank you. xoxo
- Ty on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I work at nonprofit that mostly works with students; I have been there for the last 4 years. When I do not know students' names (or don't want to try pronouncing them) I try to use respectful forms of address. So far, I've mostly stuck to 'sir' and 'ma'am,' but occasionally I call someone by the wrong gender-specific form of address and it tends to be embarrasing for the student. For example, a student today was wearing a baggy sweatshirt with the hood up, hunched over the table with their head down. I basically said 'Sir, you need to sit up and join your group,' to find that, when the student sat up straight and pulled the hood back, they were a rather tall but clearly female (with long braided pigtails that had been in the hood) individual who was not happy to have been addressed with 'sir.' There was teasing and pointed commentary throughout the rest of the class. I feel bad, and situations like this are becoming more common. I want to continue to address students respectfully, but don't want to embarrass them or create opening for bullying/disrespectful behavior that the student will have to deal with both in the immediate aftermath and likely at later times. On this thread, 'mixter' seems like it might be a good substitute, and I think it's an obvious gender-neutral form of address (if a little masculine, but if it's the only one and it's used for everyone, it should be acceptable). I'm a little wary of 'ji,' if only because I don't want answer questions about cross-cultural gender-neutral forms of address to middle/high schoolers (and I guarantee you someone will ask). 'Serah' sounds like it will be too close in pronunciation to the name 'Sarah' and 'ser' sounds like it will be too close in pronunciation to 'sir.' I like 'gent'am' - and thank you anon for suggesting it - but does anyone know of others that would be appropriate to use in conversation or in a classroom setting? The other suggestions are good, but they sound like they are more appropriate for written communications like letters/emails.
- AA on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
Hey! I haven't had all the same struggles as you, but I want you to know I'm out there, and I hear you. <3 I know it is hard to be your age, on the verge of starting out on your life independently. I personally found it so much easier once I gained distance from my parents. After high school, I moved away as soon as I could. Then I didn't have to constantly worry about their opinion or that they wouldn't understand - I didn't really care that much anymore! My parents didn't over-analyze me once I was "grown-up". You may find that they just want to love you, and don't even really want to over-analyze your life. ...I've also lived with disordered eating habits for most of my life, anxiety/depression, and questions in identity of gender/sexuality. I would say, focus on your supportive friends and your future and keep moving forward. Sending love <3
- wild_ice on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Family can be challenging, and I'm thinking religious family members, especially... We can try to be understanding of our older family members, and the fact that they are a product (victims?) of the upbringing and times that they grew up in. It's all they have ever known and they may not ever fully understand. I try to be compassionate about it. ...The good news is that everyone in "modern" generations is with you. I'm not sure your age, but I think as you get older you'll develop more independence and strength in yourself and who you are. Just know that people out there can totally relate and you'll be able to be yourself, to make your own choices, and to be happy in life. Sending love and support. <3
- wild_ice on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I understand and tend to hide too. But don't be afraid to be yourself and reach out. I'm working on this in my life. I think those who understand will embrace it. <3
- Anonymous on Profile: Kayden
I'm a fan of the following: brother/sister - sibling, sib, sibi niece/nephew - nibling, nib daughter/son - child, kid, kiddo For those who object to nibling on the grounds that it's a new word or a portmanteau, it's new only by diachronic standards. Wikitionary cites its first documented use in 1951. And the formation of portmanteaus is a fairly common linguistic process for creating new words (see 'smog', 'cosplay', and 'dumbfound'). I don't see either of those things getting in the way of widespread adoption. The reason novel pronouns haven't taken is that pronouns are high frequency function words. We use them almost without thought, the same way that most folks walk without thinking about whether to pick up their heel or their toe first. Returning to gender neutral familial terms, terms that children use for elder relations are trickier. Any term used in this capacity has to have an intelligible 1- to 2-year-old version: 'mother' becomes 'mama' or 'mommy', 'father' becomes 'dada' or 'daddy' (the latter makes more sense if you look at the etymology of 'father'). 'Parents' and 'rents' both fail that test. It's hard to say /r/ or consonant clusters (e.g., /nts/) when you're little. Maybe: aunt/uncle - 'anca' or 'aunca' ('aunt' portmanteaued with 'unca', the little kid version of 'uncle') grandma/grandpa - 'grand' or 'gigi' (with hard /g/ sounds) mother/father - 'mather', 'maddy', and 'mama' (Yes, I know that someone is screaming, but 'mama' is more logical developmentally for kids than 'mada' or 'mapa' and the like.)
- ekatrinya on Question: Gender-neutral family names
I love that, especially when you consider the ability of sibs to bicker and quibble, sometimes just for fun.
- ekatrinya on Question: Gender-neutral family names
Hey, as someone who is going through the same thing, you need to know that there are people out there to help and guide you. Your mother might not understand and you may need to just sit her down and explain. I may be wrong, but just having an adult conversation seems to work the best. Again, I may be wrong, but just remember that people care about you. - Kiddo
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I came out to my very Christian parents a few days ago, saying that I wanted to be addressed as a "they" or if that was too hard, as my first name. My father has taken extreme measures to overcoming my "confusing phase" as he calls it by announcing at church, "Look at my beautiful daughter! She is my oldest and most mature daughter and she will do many things, like be the first woman to become an Astrophysicist!" I hate it and he will not use the correct pronouns. My mother, on the other hand, refuses to bring up the topic. It makes me sick. The only people that seem to understand are my other friends that are in the LGBT group. It seems like the only people who cannot grasp the concept of being Agender are my parents. I realize that this is just a waste of data and space, so I'm going to end my little testimony here.
- Agender_Kiddo on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I was born a girl and for the past few years I've been questioning that. I'm beginning to tell my close group of friends that I don't identify as either gender, but the person who didn't believe me and criticized me was my twin sister; the one person who I thought would understand the most. I've not told my parents yet because they are very strict about staying as your birth gender, but I'm trying to make them see that a person doesn't just have to be "Red" or "Blue". A person can also be "Purple". I want to find a way for them to understand and the LGBT and Non Binary community had really helped, but I am still feeling alone and helpless. All my friends have taken my coming out better than I thought they would, but I'm afraid of what my parents would do if I told them. Would they think I'm Gay or Lesbian? Would they practically disown me and stop talking to me? I have many friends that are Straight, Gay, Lesbian and Bi, but I don't know anyone who's gender queer personally and that just makes the suffering worse. Do I just go out and say "I'm gender less." or do I have to find another way?
- Alexis the Human on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
closest chemist to me. champix starter pack dosing instructions - anti depression drugs list,
- payomakip on Question: Birth Control & Dysphoria
Hey, I have not come out yet either, but I am starting with the pixie cut, my mom says it's way too short and guyish, we are still on that boat, but my advice is just to stay true to who you are.
- Anonomous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hi Anonymous, first off, NO MATTER WHAT, DO NOT LET YOUR MOTHER LET YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE WRONG ABOUT WHAT YOU FEEL!!! I get that she is your mother but if she is making your feel bad then tell her, calmly but firmly, that you don't like it when she treats you like that. If she says some crap, then tell her that she has never had a problem with you before this and you were always nonbinary. You can also tell her that you feel like she has violated your privacy when she told other people that you are nonbinary because you told her that in confidence that she would support you and keep your secret/ that it should be your decision to come out to other people. Love and hope this works, ALIX. p.s. STAY STRONG. we are all with you.
- anonymoose on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
THANK YOU, everyone who participated in this thread. I needed this a LOT.
- Anonymous on Question: Female Genderqueer
I haven't seen anyone but myself use this, but I find that a combination of ma'am and sir, "Mir", works well for me. More alternatives are Mx. pronounced "mecks" or "mucks", as well as just not using either in general.
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
JADEN- I am in almost the exact same boat, no kidding. I am gender-fluid, assigned female at birth and one of my friends has come out as lesbian. For the whole "worrying that people will ask you why you are wearing boys clothes" thing here are a couple tips: 1) Just be confident about it and 2) make sure you have a supportive friendgroup. If you have a good friend group, that gets who you are, then it doesn't feel like the haters matter as much. I really have no advice on coming out, seeing as I have not come out to anyone but my 2 BFFs yet. Good luck and I hope this helps
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hey. I'm 16 years old. I am genderfluid and pansexual. I am still very confused and trouble about my identity, and trying to find some way to live at least slightly more comfortable to myself. I am also trying to come to terms with what my therapist recently tried to tell me: that I'm fastly becoming both depressive and bulimic. I know this doesn't answer anything from the original question, I'm sorry. I don't really know how the site works, and everyone in this thread seemed so kind, I thought maybe... I don't know. I am sorry if it is not the right place. I'm from a relatively small city in the Patagonia, Argentina. People here have just recently began to know the term "transgender", and the wide majority of the population still sees this as "oh, that girl just wanted to dress up as a boy, and play with a boy's toys." It is, mostly, my father's idea of a transgender person. He doesn't understand the difference between genitalia and gender, or between gender identity and sexual orientation. My mother, on the other hand, is an activist for women's and LGBTQ people's rights. I am, too. She doesn't think very well of me. We have a very complicated relationship, to the point that I was about to run away from home more than once. She recently found out about my numerous suicide attempts, and other... "Psychological issues". She thinks worse of me from it. My father also found out about all of that recently. Both make an effort to point out how important nutrition is, and how fat I still am. They both attempt to keep me from ever being alone, and from seeing my friends, since I apparently need to spend time with my parents to fix our relationship. My friends are amazing. They are incredibly open-minded, even the few heterosexual ones. I lost many of them very recently when the woman I have been madly (and slightly obsessively), in love with for 3 years, and until not long ago, my girlfriend, accuse me of raping her. Obviously, it was a lie. I do not know why she hates me now. But I do know, that it is particularly painful because both of us have been sexually abused, and raped, more than once in the past. My very open-minded friends, are firmly against what they call "labels". And my best friend, says anyone can identify as however the fuck they want. Whatever they do, if they were born a woman, or a man, that's what they always will be. In a year, I have to leave to go to university. This is probably me exaggerating, but I don't think I'll survive staying here for much longer. For many different reasons, but mostly because of how my parents manage to make me feel constantly. I told my mom I was genderfluid a few months ago. She knows the term. She looked at me, and laughed. In my face. Then she left, and we never talked about it again. So this is the context I live in, more or less. Keep in mind I need to be "well, healthy and sane enough", in a year, so I'll be allowed to leave. I am lost. I can't stand living as a woman, and I am sick of[…]
- Ty on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I don't understand why people must assign a gender to clothes... CLOTHES ARE CLOTHES!! You should be able to wear what you want and not get odd looks! Boys can wear dresses, girls can wear "boy" clothes!
- Marlie on Clothes
I know just how you feel... I am closeted, but alas, I know that she doesn't mind LGBTQ people, but I don't think that would be the case if she knew I were one of those people..., and the other thinks that they should burn in hell. I decided I would come out by the age of 15, but I don't want to conceal it anymore! :Groans:
- Marlie on The Balls
You should get a partner. Then packing at night is REALLY fun!
- Anonymous on Quietly thrilled
Use a bunched up sock.. it’s free as fuck and barely noticeable with a loose pack.
- Anonymous on Question: Packing
Hey Cj! Great question... so in my experience with chest binding the cheapest, safest, easiest, and least noticible thing to do is to use a quad. So what this is is a combination of two sports bras, and two tight fitting tank tops. You start by putting on a sports bra, and then put the second one on backwards. You then put on a forwards tank top (small sizes for best results) and then put another on backwards. Then, if you want to, it’s not nesscesary but I do it, you can put on another forward facing sports bra on over the tank tops just to hold everything together. Make sure not to wear it for too long, and be sure that the material is flexible so you can breathe. Best wishes! D.F. Lykaios
- D.F. Lykaios on Question: Binding as a Genderqueer person
I just wanted to say that I loved this. Thanks for sharing, making the film, and posting it.
- Ravyn on Being Non-binary
Attractive could be used for either gender.
- Anonymous on Question: Compliments
Hey, Jaden, I’m in a very similar position, but I just wanted to let you know that a few months ago I got permission to wear the boys uniform at school, and I was very nervous that people would bully me for it or ask too many questions. When I wore it into school a few people asked me if they would also be allowed to wear boys clothes, but other than that everyone was absolutely fine with it and no-one even questioned it. Wearing boys uniform has made me feel much more comfortable and I hope that you can work up the courage to wear what you want with pride. Good luck. :-)
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hi, I'm a queer cis girl who also studies German at school and I am doing a project on gender neutrality within german language for my class. I consulted my German friend on pronouns and she said that sier (sies/siem/sien) was the prefered pronouns of her nb and genderqueer friends. I'm not sure how widespread this is but she said she uses it fairly frequently.
- Anonymous on Question: German gender-neutral language
my life, yes
- Rae on Your Life
This is exactly how I feel! I have a nice wardrobe for a girl courtesy of my mom, but some days I just feel gross in those things, like I'm a Barbie doll whose curves are all wrong. Other days I'm confident in a crop top. I feel like I"m definitely female, but it's not my whole story, y'know? I just found a new label.
- Rae on Question: If I'm a demigirl am I still a woman?
I understand your predicament, I am also underage and gender fluid and came out to my grandmother just a few days ago, she didn't know what it means to be gender fluid and thought I was talking about sexuality 10 mins into the conversation. However she is a diehard liberal so she was pretty accepting even though she doesn't really understand. You parent might have a very difficult time trying to understand you, they might blame themselves, or try to fix you if they are against gays then it might be worse than that. My advice would be to first think about how homophobic they are and how they might possibly react to you being gender fluid. If you don't feel comfortable coming out than try making small changes to your appearance if you wish. I had short hair for two years before I came out. makimg small changes can really help with dysphoria. I'm hope I could be of some help to you
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
add me on facebook i can show you all of my different outfit.
- mitchell worthington on Manly Corset
I like your lil homeslice of self revelation on genderfork Would you consent to be my pen pal, perhaps It would be really cool-xciting for me to have someone s far away and yet so close (in some experiences of self? -perhaps, gender?) to bounce minds with I am 32 and 5 months. I have lived a lot, you get me ...and much struggle The reveal of your academic aspirations and fears was what probably made me reach out like this Also it's xmas ?????? and i know a new correspondence would cheer me (not to say I am (or ain't) Christian but, I mean,dark times in the sense of earth tilt and cold as well as the apparent lurching towards fascism that has me periodically scared shitless along with my personal melee of fear, and all that ... If your interested zeke_coleslaw@hushmail.com, as well as the address above Happy Winter!?????? wishing you happiness as well as peace and rest, and safety
- Zeke P. King on Profile: Ian
It is easier to make smaller changes first.... and you don\'t necessarily need to make any changes just because you are genderfluid. As for pronouns, I\'ve had a lot of genderfluid friends that started having their friends use they and she to refer to them... just do whatever feels comfortable.... and with your moms... even if they don\'t understand just remember you will be okay. Because they are your parents and they love you, they probably won\'t be too harsh. If they are really mean about certain things don\'t take it personally, they grew up in a different time and it might be harder for them to change their views, on the contrary, they might be completely okay with it or maybe even know exactly what being gender fluid means. It is important to continue being yourself and learn how to accept yourself. What others think doesn\'t really matter because honestly...it\'s not their life and if they don\'t appreciate you for who you are then that\'s their problem. Anyways, I wish you good luck!
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
It is easier to make smaller changes first.... and you don't necessarily need to make any changes just because you are genderfluid. As for pronouns, I've had a lot of genderfluid friends that started having their friends use they and she to refer to them... just do whatever feels comfortable.... and with your moms... even if they don't understand just remember you will be okay. Because they are your parents and they love you, they probably won't be too harsh. If they are really mean about certain things don't take it personally, they grew up in a different time and it might be harder for them to change their views, on the contrary, they might be completely okay with it or maybe even know exactly what being gender fluid means. It is important to continue being yourself and learn how to accept yourself. What others think doesn't really matter because honestly...it's not their life and if they don't appreciate you for who you are then that's their problem. Anyways, I wish you good luck!
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hi I’m only 13 and I’ve only really just learned what gender fluid is but I believe I do conform to it. I am too scared to make any changes to my self such as cutting my hair and wearing the boys school uniform especially. I already where boys clothes and I have a gender fluid friend (he’s a g) both my mums are gay but I don’t think they’ll understand and it keeps me awake at night. As for at school I don’t know what my peers will think. I’m still happy with my female body I just find it easier to talk to boys and can relate I am positive in fluid but I’m afraid of pronouns and changing myself. Can anyone help?
- Darc on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I’m going through the same struggle. Sometimes I feel extremely detached from my assigned female identity (and dysphoric about my body) but sometimes I don’t think about it and I feel fine with being called a girl. Demigirl genderflux feels right, but I’m afraid that if I came out to people they’d just think I was a “special snowflake” who wants attention.
- Anonymous on Question: If I'm a demigirl am I still a woman?
I as a trans 13 year old have to say health concerns are very important but the same is said for not letting your child bind. It can be the worst torture in the world to look in the mirror so I would say let them bind just regularly ask and check up on them about it. And keep on being supportive! Love the tranny panny Frankie! ?
- Frankie on Question: Binder for 13 year old
Hi Jaden, That's almost literally exactly the same situation I'm in. One of my friends came out to me as bi too last year, and I really want to come out to her. The good thing about our society now, (at least for the most part) is that pretty much everyone can wear "boy's clothes" and people were fine with it. Best of luck.
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
"Ji" pronounced gee (like gee wiz) While not common in America and perhaps not good for the workplace since it's uncommon, in India when you're referring to someone you don't know or someone you respect like an elder or someone with authority or someone you're working for they use the title "ji" regardless of gender. It's also used after people's names like sarah-ji or John-ji when you know their name or are closer to the person. I hope it picks up here because it's truly genderless!!
- Nina on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
One problem is getting someone's attention that you have no name for. 'Excuse me, but you dropped your credit card' works sometimes. But general getting the attention of someone... But 'Excuse me' hollered at a retreating person several times does not always get their attention. We need a new word!
- Bill on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
"You definitely sound like a sir" would be devastating to at least one of my transgender friends. The rest of what you're saying is great, I think, but honestly, just leave off that "you definitely sound like" bit. Most Trans people I know understand that they will be misgendered on occasion and they'll deal with it, but just a quick, "Oh, I'm sorry," and then moving on is vastly preferred than a statement that reinforces whether or not they "pass." Of course, then there's me. I'm non-binary. I'm really not a "Sir" or a "Ma'am." I personally have no objection to either of them, so nobody has to worry about me, but that's not universal. I hope a new term comes up organically.
- Strange on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
I choose to wear button up shirts over a t shirt...but leaving them unbuttoned (does that make sense) I wear a plaid shirt over my regular shirt almost every other day because it does a really good job at hiding my curvy-ish shape.... other than that.... darker shirts also help and make most curves appear smaller.... you can also wear dark shirts with unbuttoned shirts.....and the good news is both of those things can usually be found in the women's section so yeah
- Anonymous on Question: Disguising hips
I'm not sure of my gender identity but I can strongly relate to being genderfluid. I came out to my mom about a month ago... I just told her I wasn't sure whether or not I was a boy or girl and she seemed okay with it at first.... but then she started getting mad at me for wanting to wear different clothes.... she kept telling me I was wrong about the way I felt..... she would come in too my room and say random things that would hurt my feelings.....all of the sudden she wants me to do all these super girly things..... I can't stand it anymore.... she makes me so ashamed of who I am... on top of that after I told her she told a bunch of other people too.... it's been absolutely terrifying having her know... but at the same time I'm glad to not have this huge secret to hide... her boyfriends sons have started making jokes all the time about me being nonbinary and all this other stuff too.... I'm scared and I need help deciding which step I need to take in order to start fixing things...
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
-You could potentially tie a jacket around your waste? Not the most fashionable or long term solution but it might help!-
- Esile on Question: Disguising hips
You can say sir or ma'am. If a caller corrects you say "oh my goodness I'm so sorry- you definitely sound like a sir (or Ma'am)" I get the whole TG issue- but TG folks should take it easy- the operator can only hear you- they can't see you and your awesomeness. Correct the agent and cut them a little slack. The agent should then say- "which pronoun or respectful title would you prefer? I want to make you feel comfortable:" I agree: try saying their names if you can't determine respectful title. If they only spell it for you and you don't know how to pronounce it- try your best to pronounce it. Apologize if you mispronounce it, and say "I like it! or "I'll practice that!" In short try their names, sir or ma'am is a back-up. If you mess up- just apologize and be gracious and a little self-deprecating. The caller will understand.
- Delia QA SPecialist on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
Hello, Anon. I'm turning thirteen in a few weeks (close enough) and ever since I was about eight, I always felt wrong being stuck in a male skin. I wasn't like any other boy I'd ever met-- I did strange things, like crossdressing, and it just felt right. My little kid mind just knew to break more stereotypes and be myself no matter what so and it felt great. But, my dysphoria only started kicking in at age 10, when my legit evil step parent started emotionally abusing me like he does to this day. He'd bully me for telling Mom when he did mean things to me at first, but then he started bullying me for doing certain things because I was a boy. That confused me, and I started noticing the signs. I didn't learn of the LGBTQ+ community until I was at least twelve, but I knew something was up. About a week ago, I finally saw what was right under my nose the whole time-- I'm genderfluid. But, that's the easy part. The hard part will be coming out. I'm not sure when to do it (maybe Coming Out Day 2018?), but I'm worried that my Dad will think I'm trying to throw a pity party for myself and crap, or that my EXTREME right-wing Grandpa will find out and... I don't even know! ? So, yes. I'm a lot like you and I'm not sure when to come out. Maybe we can do it together.
- C.H. on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I am gender fluid and I am not out to anyone, I am underage and I feel really bad not being able to dress the gender I feel. I want to come out but my Mom and Dad don't like gays so I don't know if they would be accepting of me. I don't have any friends that are queer, I don't know who to talk to about this and I'm scared.
- Confused Unicorn on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hey Jordan, I'm Kat, I'm androgynous meaning I have both male and female characteristics and I was reading your profile and thought we had a few similar interests. I was wondering if you would like to talk sometime maybe over social media if you have it? Kat. x
- Kat on Profile: Jordan
Hey Alex I'm Kat. I'm female and identify as female but I am androgynous meaning I have both male and female characteristics. I really liked reading your profile as I had previously been having the same problems. I was wondering if you wanted to talk, maybe on social media if you have Instagram? Kat x
- Kat on Profile: Alex
The students in my high school class have created a word to fill this need in the English language. Please feel free to use it. Perhaps we can get in into the dictionary to officially bring a gender-neutral “sir/ma’am” into existence. Gent’am - A respectful way to greet a man or a woman This word can be used as a substitute for “sir” or “ma’am,” and is appropriate and honorable for both the young and elderly.
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
How do I figure out what style fits my body type?
- Anonymous on Question: Tips for masculinizing feminine faces?
I love this... <3
- Ravyn on Your Life
You can use compression shorts! I myself haven't got a pair, but they are meant for athletic purposes and can flatten your hips and butt a little. Since they're meant for movement, they're also comfortable and wont hurt your body. Most of them have a pocket in the front meant for an athletic cup, and this can be used for packing. They're fairly unambiguous too, so asking for a pair probably won't make it obvious that you're trans.
- Callum on Question: Disguising hips
"Honorable Lastname" might sometimes work.
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
Hi, I'm thirteen and recently discovered I'm gender fluid. I know my parents are going to accept this as they support my trans uncle and take me to the Pride Festival, but I am sure they suspect I'm gay. How should tell them I'm LGBTQIA+ but not in the way I think
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I work at a daycare and we just call them all "friends," which has now transferred over to my adult life.
- Anonymous on Question: Gender-neutral family names
I'm thirteen and i want to wear a binder but my mum won't let me because she said it would make my breasts sag, not that i could care much. Is this true?
- Anonymous on Question: Binders and Sagging?
This is a really old post but as soon as I saw it I had to reply. I always feel more masculine during my period and my dysphoria always gets so much worse. I usually end up wearing a sweatshirt every day of the week and this one pair of baggy-ish pants for a lot of the week too. I will come home at the end of the day and just cry. I am so glad that there's other people I can relate to on here.
- Anonymous on Silent Reassurance
Hello everyone My name is Rose or Rob and I am a 15-year-old genderfluid. So ever during the begging of 2017, I started to question my gender.At one point I felt like a boy and then another I felt like a girl.so when I was 14 I discovered the term "Genderqueer" and when I found that out I was like wow this describes me.and so that went on for 3 months until Pride Month. During that time I discovered genderfluidity and I did not know what that meant at the time so I googled it and I saw that it meant "denoting or relating to a person who does not identify themselves as having a fixed gender." and when I saw this I was like this describes me so much.I started to try dress masculine but I couldn't bc I have long hair and other stuff like that so during the new school year I dress as masculine and feminine but I need lots of other things so and some advice from other genderfluid people.So if anyone is willing to help please do and my parents will not buy me masculine clothing so any help will do.
- Rose/Rob on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I am 53 years old and have been gender fluid all my life. Only more recently have I been able to more fully embrace it since I told my wife and she has been very supportive. She had already noticed my involuntary gender swings over the years and had wondered if I was gay. I'm not but since I'm also attracted to women when in girl mode, maybe in that way I am. I am AMAB and wear things that are all over the gender spectrum and don't let societal gender limitations get in the way. My closet is full of masculine and feminine clothing and my life is much richer and fuller being able to be me. I never feel like any one label suits me since my gender flows back and forth all the time so gender fluid works for me. I also like the term gendermutt. I'm so glad to find this thread since so much online about nonbinary is all by younger people. I think its great that they can more freely express who they are at a younger age because that is something we were not able to do. I notice so many of them use the term genderqueer which is something I can't bring myself to do because the word queer was weaponized against me for so many years when I was growing up. Sure, it would be nice to turn it around into something positive but the sting in that word reminds me of too many old emotional wounds I'd rather forget. I wonder how different my life would be if we all had been more free to express our real selves starting at a younger age?
- Casey Draper on Question: Older but genderfluid
Foods that boost estrogen: sesame seeds, apricots, strawberries, many dried fruits, carrots, kale, celery, tofu, chickpeas, peas, and pinto beans. Foods that boost testosterone: oils like olive and canola, olives, avocados, cashews, almonds, lobster/crab, oatmeal, bananas, low fat yogurt, and kidney beans. For estrogen, its usually plant based food that have phytoestrogens, and for testosterone, its usually foods high with zinc or monounsaturated fat. If you look up 'foods to boost testosterone/estrogen', you will most likely find an article or a list. Also, don't eat too many almonds, because they also contain traces of cyanide, and eating to many can kill you.
- Anonymous on Question: Tips for masculinizing feminine faces?
Thanks so much for that bit of info Josey/Josh. IDK why but this really helpe me when I read this. I'm fourteen and the fifth out of six children in my family, I have completely mentally accepted myself as gender fluid but I really don't feel ready to tell my family because my oldest sister/brother came out as trans assuming our family would accept him... But instead he was constantly abused by our father and died at age eighteen because of it, our mom never accepted him and didn't care when dad beat him. She didn't even care when my brother died. I'm mourning to this day and as scared as ever to come out and I don't think I ever will. I'm scared as shit and I don't know what to do. Please help!
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I am 70 years old and have been gender fluid all my life. My life has been a struggle since I was about 8 years old. Back then, they didn't call us gender fluid. We were gender identity disorder and some would say homosexual but I wasn't. That was the way it was. When I went into the Army and had my physical, the doctor asked me if I had anything wrong. I told him that on some days I'd wake up and be female and other days a male. He looked at me and said, "Which one are you today?" I told him I was a boy and he told me to get in line because I was in the Army now. I made it thru 22 years but struggled so much. I got married and have continued to struggle, but here I am and now I can finally accept myself as gender fluid instead of some disorder. And yes, I still have lots of times that I feel feminine.
- Mark on Question: Older but genderfluid
Get a build-a-bear. Preferably a rainbow-ish one. Get a voice thing for it and have it be a recording of you saying what you are.
- Ginge on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Absolutely stunning!
- Hannah on Alana
les love boat are pretty unsafe, I heard
- Anonymous on Question: First time buying a binder
I don't know how to tell my mom at all, she does not believe that genders other than cisgender are valid. And everytime she sees somebody breaking a gender role/norm, she gets weirded out. I love my mom so much and I'm scared that telling her will make her think of me a lot differently. Any advice or suggestions??
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Really hard telling who, your parents or friends? Yes it is very hard to tell people. I don't know your age but if you are still in school and under 18 years old, maybe you need to wait a bit. All of us go thru changes in our lives. In the meantime, you might see if you can find someone to talk about it with you that you would feel comfortable with. The final decision has to be yours and only yours.
- Mark on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
Hey Im Genderfluid and im just a kid and its really hard telling them... help?
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
My comment won't help, but why are the first two commenting about hair and picture of all things... Also, I've also been having a "sick" heart. It's a weird feeling that can't exactly be described, except for being sick... Just realised those are from 6-7 yes ago... I've also had change of breathing. Not being able to run as much as I usually do. And the bone above my chest feels... "Bruised" ...
- Anonymous on My heart feels sick.
Gender Fluid is a new term in my lifetime. I've been gender fluid all my life and can tell all of you that life has not always been easy. It's not like I decide the day before that I will be feminine tomorrow. I go to bed, the brain starts working on that and I can't sleep well. The next day, I am feminine. I've had to fight it off more times than I wanted to. I was in the Army for 22 years and had to be a mocho man and a lot of times I fought with myself. I would get depressed at times as I couldn't come out like you can today. I had to deal with it. No, I am not gay. But I am pansexual. I just want to get this off my chest as I know many of you take a lot of crap about it. We aren't deviants. We are gender fluid.
- Mark on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
My Liege indicates that you are in fealty to them which is very much not the same as just addressing them. I would suggest Good Gentle as a neutral form of address.
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
I hear My Liege is a fairly neutral thing to call them (tho I'm looking for a better word to use that's not a mashup of those two words since My Liege is kinda... already made?)
- Anonymous on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"
I want to come out to my mom for about a week now, but I don't think that she would accept it. And I was thinking that maybe I just wouldn't tell her, but I want to start wearing more masculine clothes sometimes and I've wanted a more androgynous haircut for a while. I've just recently started accepting that I truly am not a girl, not all the way atleast. I just wish that explaining this to my parents could be easier.
- Anonymous on Question: Coming out as gender fluid
I like the idea of Per. Especially if it became a norm. Working at a library, honorifics are what I use to speak with patrons. "Hello Sir" "Ma'am, please quiet your phone" "Miss, you forgot your card... MISS?" The last one being an attempt to get someone's attention from a distance. "Hello Per" "Per, please quiet your phone" "Per, you forgot your card... PER?" In groups it is much easier to find a gender non specific. And I love the way Comrade is nearly ideal in purpose and use... But would end up being inappropriate in the setting of public service.
- Raye on Question: Alternatives to "Sir" and "ma'am"

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